The Thing About Weirdos…

Have you ever felt like you didn’t really belong? Like when you look around, it’s like watching Planet of the Apes- sure everyone looks vaguely like you, and the world looks familiar, but you still don’t quite fit? Also Helena Bonham Carter is there without Jonny Depp? It’s all just a little off.

When I was a teenager, this feeling made me very self-conscious. I tried to keep myself to myself and when I got physically and verbally attacked by other teens, I just took it because I felt like I deserved it. I was an outsider in their world after all.

Yep, like pretty much all creative people, I had a hard time as teen. Boohoo. You know what though? The thing about weird people is…they grow up to be freaking awesome.

I’m not just talking about me here, though I do think I’m pretty awesome. And hot. And humble. But it’s actually the case of almost all weird people I’ve met or know of. The fact is, weird youngsters get a hard time because most people their age don’t see the oddness for what it is- Intelligence/creativity/humour.

Believe it or not, I didn’t even see this truth clearly until I was re-watching (for the billionth time) a series of RuPauls Drag Race and the Queens were talking about how they were ostracised as teens, and now they’re revered for their art.

I’m in my 30s and I’m only just now starting to put myself out there a little more with my writing and my humour etc, and the funny thing is, it’s not just hearing that other people like what I’m doing that’s so empowering, it’s how I feel about what I’m doing.

My point is, if you, like me, ever feel or felt like you’re not normal- it’s because you’re not, and that’s a really, really good thing. The world might not get you yet, but they will. And when that day comes, make sure you’re ready to show exactly what you’re made of!

6 thoughts on “The Thing About Weirdos…

  1. Good post! Just yesterday I read a quote by an author and writing teacher named Rebecca McClanahan. She said her students always talked about how they felt like outsiders viewing themselves “going through the motions” when interacting with other people in ordinary life situations. McClanahan thinks it’s a trait that encourages creative people to become writers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wise words, indeed! My teachers were always stifling my creativity with nonsense like, ‘that’s all well and nice, Strange. But I’m afraid ‘Basics of BDSM’ is not a suitable topic for a middle school book report.’ 🙄

      Liked by 1 person

  2. So true! I wish I knew in high school what I know now. I was definetly one of the weird kids in school but love how I am now!

    Like

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